Mar5

New gTLD Arrival to Midphase: Welcome .science!

Posted by Kelly Kirkham

Science.com, science.net and science.org were registered long ago. But you can now register your own piece of science on the web with yourdomain.science at Midphase.com!

Science, stemming from the Latin word scientia meaning ‘knowledge’, encompasses a wide range of topics, too many to list in this post. But we can celebrate the brilliant scientists who helped shape the world we live in today through discovery, invention and exploration.

As a celebration of the latest generic top level domain (gTLD) to join our roster, here are the great minds of .science. Join the 14,000 other .science registrations to make your mark on the world of all things scientific at Midphase.com  shutterstock_252142030

Mortal as I am, I know that I am born for a day, but when I follow the serried multitude of the stars in their circular course, my feet no longer touch the earth, I ascend to Zeux himself to feast me on ambrosia, the food of the gods. – Claudius Ptolemy

In the 2nd century, a scientist named Claudius Ptolemy produced the geocentric model of the solar system. Although his example wasn’t exactly right, he discovered many other astronomical elements for later scientists to build on. He also wrote about the properties of light, including refraction, color and reflection. His work with astronomy, mathematics, astrology and writings were years ahead of his fellow scientists.shutterstock_252135118

In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.– Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei, born in 1564, created one of the first modern telescopes and proved that the earth revolved around the sun. His work in science laid the groundwork for kinetics, engineering, astronomy and philosophy. Galileo also played a major role in the scientific revolution during the Renaissance. He has been referred to as the “father of modern observational astronomy”. Galileo’s ideas about a heliocentric solar system led to sentencing and imprisonment for the crime of heresy as his ideas conflicted with those of the Catholic church at the time.shutterstock_242291527

To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. –Leonardo Da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci is considered to be the world’s most accomplished polymath, meaning that he was exceptionally talented at many different subjects. Some of his many titles cover: painter, sculptor, musician, mathematician, inventor, geologist, cartographer, botanist and writer. His works of arts are celebrated across the Europe, and his flying machine and adding machine were the precursors to modern airplanes and calculators.        shutterstock_81842473

And now we might add something concerning a certain most subtle spirit which pervades and lies hid in all gross bodies; by the force and action of which spirit the particles of bodies attract one another at near distances. –Sir Isaac Newton

We have all heard the story of Sir Isaac Newton and the apple tree but in truth, Newton discovered many more things besides gravity. His book Principia Mathematica formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation and was held as truth for the next three centuries. His work with astrology led to the accounts for trajectories of comets, tides and the precision of the equinoxes. He also removed all doubts concerning the validity of the heliocentric model of the Solar System.170px-Marie_Curie_1903

Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. -Marie Curie

A Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, Marie Curie conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the only woman to ever win twice. Her first Nobel prize was awarded to her from her work with radiation and her second was for her work in the elements radium and polonium. When she first discovered these chemical elements, she named polonium after her native land. Curie died in France in 1934 due to aplastic anemia from the extended exposure to radiation during her work.

We have only covered five of the thousands of great minds devoting their lives to science. Create your own tribute to the many facets of science with a .science domain, unique to all disciplines of science. From geology to chemistry and physics to biology this new domain is for you.

Visit Midphase.com to check the availabilty of the .science domain you have in mind!


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